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Q: The car has been sitting under cover for 9 years. I am going to use it now. Adding fuel is showing several leaks in the tank.

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I live in florida. The car is in NY. I stored my daddy's Lincoln town car at a friend's house under cover outside. Adding fuel showed several leaks in the tank. I am told that the tank as well as fuel pump must be replaced because the pump is in the tank. Does this sound correct?

A: Yes, all leaks must be repaired but the fue...

Yes, all leaks must be repaired but the fuel tank itself may be the easiest issue, in terms of what will likely need to be done. Of more concern are all of the interconnecting steel tubes (fuel and brake lines, too, by the way), which, if original, are probably highly corroded and possibly perforated. If there is significant corrosion on the steel fuel lines those will have to be replaced at the same time that the tank is replaced, otherwise you will be doing this job all over again once the car is put in service. Really, to do it right, make it a lasting repair and ensure reliable service, on a car of this age the filler tube assembly, the tank, and ALL tubing from the tank to the engine compartment, including return lines, should be completely changed out.

The preferred replacement tubing is Ni-Copp (or comparable) which is a non ferrous DOT approved tubing material that will NEVER rust. Use stainless steel fittings with the Ni-Copp. Ni-Copp is incredibly easy to work with - orders of magnitude easier than steel - and thus outstanding for DIY and in-field (Mechanic) use. The fuel leaks have nothing to do with the fuel pump. The fuel pump may very well work but due to its age it probably would be prudent to just buy a new one. YourMechanic can repair the leaks, using whatever material you prefer, replace the tank and pump, and also deal with whatever start-up issues arise once you are ready to get the car in service. All of this can be done at your location.

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