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Q: Car runs poorly and stalls 1992 Oldsmobile 88

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I have a 1992 oldsmobile 88 is not running properly. I try to press on the gas and hesitates or turns off. I scan get code 42 electronic spark timing and no camshaft sensor signal . Also get pass key malfunction when I accelerate the car.What is your suggestion?

My car has 160000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Hello - the engine hesitation and stalling, along with the Code 42, indicate a problem with ignition timing for your car. On your car, the ignition module provide a basic engine timing profile. While running, ignition timing shifts to the engine management computer, which has a more precise ignition timing profile for the engine. This provide smoother running, and more power. The Code 42 indicates this transition is not occurring. This can be caused by wiring issues, a poor engine-to-computer, or engine-to-ignition module ground. Also possible is a failure of the ignition module or engine management computer (not likely since the engine runs at all). I would recommend a professional evaluate the electrical engine management components above to diagnose this problem. A mobile, professional mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, will come to your location, diagnose this problem, give you an accurate assessment of damage and cost estimate for repairs. The Pass-Key issue you describe is likely a problem with the key or ignition switch tumbler. Your Pass-Key has raised connections, and the ignition switch has a "reader" component that contacts these raised connections on the key. Either the key connections are worn, or the "reader" component in the ignition switch is weak. When you accelerate, this connection is wiggled (heavy keyring?), and the connection is momentarily broken, causing the fault you are experiencing. Both the key and ignition switch tumbler should be replaced to eliminate this problem. Unfortunately, this is not a service that YourMechanic can offer at this time. Check with your Oldsmobile dealer or service center for this repair.

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