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Q: Still overheating after replaced coolant

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My car began to overheat while driving to the point where I had to pull over. Smoke was coming from underneath the hood and the temperature gage was all the way in the red. The coolant was low, so I added some to the required level and went to get an oil change thinking that had something to do with it. The car began to overheat again. I was thinking it could be the coolant pump but the mechanic said it is costly to take it out and replace, so I am trying to avoid doing that if it could possible be something else. Any ideas on what else would cause it to consistently overheat like this?

My car has 122000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

The overheating of your engine can be caused by a few component malfunctions. The low coolant was a good catch. You then need to ask yourself what caused it to be so low. There may be a leak in the system somewhere. The water pump can be a lengthy repair to make. If that is the cause of the issue, there is no other repair to make besides replacing it. The thermostat can also cause these issues. If it does not open and allow the right about of coolant to enter the system the engine cooling will not take place. If the radiator has failed to cool the coolant, the coolant will not be able to absorb heat from the engine. The fans that assist in cooling the radiator can also fail. The technician that did the original diagnosis may have ruled out some of these possibilities already.

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