Q: Replacing rear drum brakes with a new rear drum brake kit.

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Car is being restored. Hasn't been driven in over 20-25 years + but has been garaged and covered at all times. Rear quarters have been replaced and all sheet metal is rust free. Engine turned over when last started many years ago and is numbers matching. Transmission is original as well but does not seem to go in gear when last tried also many years ago. I would like to begin by starting from the bottom up and get the car rolling so that I might be able to transport the car from shop to shop. In an attempt to save some money I bought a rear drum brake kit from In Line Tube which states to just bolt on and bleed the brakes and your done. My question is do I need to remove the Posi Traction rear axle in order to install the new kit? If this is the case I'm probably going to need a lot more help than I thought. Thank you Steve.

My car has 65000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Hello. If you are replacing the entire rare bakes as a set up, which is sounds like, then yes, the axle will need to come out. this wold be the only wat to remove the backing plates. Once the axles are reinstalled the differential fluid can be refilled to help prolong the drivertrain. It also comes at a good time as the axle seals will probably be dry from years of not running. If you want to have these brakes installed, consider YourMechanic, as a certified mechanic can come to your home or office to install these.

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