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Q: Overheating issue

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Had a leak near hose fitting. Was in a bind so I used a radiator stop leak product. Truck ran fine for a couple days, then started overheating. I flushed the cooling system. Replaced thermostat. Replaced water pump. Replaced lower radiator hose that was collapsing. It's full on coolant, and still overheats. What do I check now?

My car has 195000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Hello. If there are no visible leaks and the cooling system appears to be full but is still overheating, then the first thing I would do is make sure that the system is properly bled. If there are any air bubbles trapped in the system it may cause the engine to overheat. If the system is bled and the truck continues to overheat then it may be possible that the head gasket may be leaking. This can happen if the engine was severely overheated, or if the vehicle was driven for too long while running hot. Leaky head gaskets can sometimes be difficult to diagnose, however a few common symptoms are overheating, oil/coolant contamination in the crankcase, and white smoke from the tailpipe. If this is the case the engine will usually have to be dissembled in order to be repaired. Because these sorts of issues can sometimes be difficult to diagnose, I would recommend having a professional technician, such as one from YourMechanic, inspect the overheating issue if you are unsure.

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