Q: Losing water

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I jus had my whole engine redone. New pistons, new water pipes. It's a new engine. But I'm topping my water up about every 3 days. I don't see any leaks.

Hi and thank you for your question. After having your engine repaired and rebuilt, there should not be any problems with any coolant leakage. However, there could be a few problems that you could trace out. If you have an automatic transmission and it has a cooler within the radiator, check the transmission fluid to see if it is contaminated with water. It will look milky in color. If the fluid is milky they your problem lies within the radiator having an internal leak into the transmission cooling lines. You could also check the heater system to see if coolant is leaking out and dripping onto the exhaust system. If the heating system is capped off or if you have no leaks, then you could have a problem with a casting plug (freeze plug) in the engine just above the exhaust manifold. If the coolant leaks out slowly onto the exhaust manifold, it will burn off and and leave no trace on the ground. I recommend getting a pressure tester for your cooling system and pressure it up to 14 PSI. Then see where the leak is coming from. Maybe the leak only occurs when the vehicle is pressurized. If you would like help, consider having an expert automotive technician from YourMechanic come to your home or office to inspect and diagnose this issue for you, and make or suggest any repairs as needed.

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