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Q: I have to grind the starter to get the vehicle started.

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I had this car completely restored and it has operated with no issues for over a year. Recently, when I start my vehicle, I have to grind the starter to get the vehicle started. Once the key moves to the auxiliary position, it's as if the engine loses the power to keep the car running.

A: Well, it's your lucky day because old F...

Well, it's your lucky day because old Fords are what I specialize in. I have 3 in my driveway now. It sounds like your condenser and your points may be bad in the distributor. The condenser stores electricity and the points open and close with the timing of the cam shaft and delivers a spark to the spark plug at the exact time the cylinder is at the top of its compression stroke. What happens is that the condenser loses its ability to store energy and will not deliver enough spark to the spark plug. When the key is in the start position it actually delivers more electricity to the distributor therefore if will run only when your trying to start the car. I would suggest getting rid of the factory distributor and getting an aftermarket electronic distributor. You can get them now for around $50. They only require 3 wires and will save you a lot of trouble in the future they do not use the old condenser and point system everything is controlled electronically with a magnetic sensor instead of points. I would recommend having a technician come and diagnose to see if that is the problem, and replace the points and condenser as needed.

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