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Q: I have a coolant problem

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Usually every other week ill look at my fluids and stuff. Seems like every 2 months I uave to refill my car with coolant...There are no signs of leaks making spots under my car and the temp gauge on my dash shows that its not overheating. What could be the problem

My car has 88000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

A: Hey there. You have a small leak that accum...

Hey there. You have a small leak that accumulates over time to become apparent. If you have a plastic coolant reservoir, also known as an overflow tank, you’ll want to check that reservoir for cracks or leaks. A quick and easy way to find the small leak, which by the way could be simply be at the water pump housing weep hole, is to pressurize the cooling system to about 15 PSI (mechanics have portable systems to do this via the radiator cap), when the engine is stone cold of course, and then systematically trace all hoses and parts for signs of the leak.

Typically, this strategy will work excepting those cases where the leak only occurs on a hot engine when parts expand at differential rates, thus "opening up" the leak. In that case, it might be necessary to add a small amount of UV leak tracer dye to the coolant which will deposit itself at the leak exit and be picked up by a special light. It is a good idea to track this leak down and repair it so as to avoid future problems or complications. A certified professional from YourMechanic can come to your car’s location to pinpoint the source of the coolant problem so that this can be repaired.

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