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Q: How to know if aixle or drive shaft

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Noise under car when making turn sound like scraping noise or like two pieces metal rubbing together.

My car has 41000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

An axle and a drive shaft are basically the same thing. If you were to differentiate between the two, a drive shaft has u-joints and a CV (constant velocity) axle uses CV joints. The scraping noise heard when turning is a very common pattern failure on front wheel drive vehicles. Of course, I haven’t actually heard the noise, but based on your description, the most likely cause here is a bad CV axle joint.

It should be fairly easy to determine what side of the car has the damaged axle. If you see a ripped CV axle boot, this is a good time to replace the axle as well. Usually a ripped boot is the precursor to a failed CV joint. If it is a failed CV axle, I would describe the sound as a ratcheting sound. Certainly metal rubbing together, but they would make a ratcheting sound while turning.

There can be other failures that can cause this sound, so before you run out and replace an axle, be sure there isn’t something like a rock caught between the brake disc and the dust shield at the wheel.

I’d recommend having the car inspected by a certified mechanic who can diagnose the noise in person, then they can make the appropriate repairs.

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