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Q: Driver is told that his SUV's safety equipment is unreliable

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I received a call through my integrated bluetooth. After ending the call via the steering wheel controls, the ‘driver’s information center’ stayed in the call mode. Even after the passenger verified that the call was ended, it wouldn’t change and stayed in call mode. The ‘driver’s information center’ returned to speedometer mode after around three minutes. Ten minutes after that, when I was backing into a parking space next to an office building, the following failed: drivers information center radar display, the backup camera and radar, and the seat vibration safety features. While looking in outside mirror to park properly, all the safety equipment previously listed, failed and I hit the building with my vehicle. It was minimal damage to my SUV (hitch cover paint), but there was also damage to the office building. The hitch cover left an impression in the wood siding about ½ inch deep. The center dash screen backup camera kept in navigation mode and the driver’s display stayed in speedometer mode while in reverse. I headed to the dealership, but they couldn’t duplicate what had happened to me. They told me that backing into the building was my fault and that I shouldn’t rely on the safety equipment in my SUV. Do you agree with them that the safety technology with which our vehicles are equipped is not reliable?

A: Hello. It is true that these systems should...

Hello. It is true that these systems should not be relied upon as your primary function of safety. They are not always 100% accurate and may not work as well as being vigilant on our own. These are simply considered to be convenience items. If they are not turning on and off correctly then there is a problem. Most of the time the module that controls this system needs to be reprogrammed as it is not communicating correctly. This would need to be done by the dealer. However, if you’d like a second opinion on this, consider YourMechanic as a certified professional can help you diagnose the issue with these components and suggest a fix.

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