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Q: Dies randomly and now wont start

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So I have an `87 first year of the Wrangler Jeep. My 1st problem has always seemed to be having an "electric gremlin" My battery always drains within 48hrs so I have to disconnect it every night or it dies. My most pertinent problem is that while driving it will randomly cut off without notice ( no noises or forewarnings) done dead. Usually, I can restart it but now I can't, no matter what. I am not a novice, I have worked on the jeep myself for years and usually can get it started with a few sprays of engine starter in the carburetor. I have brought into 6 different shops! They all tune, and replace hoses and replaced 2 carburetors (yes twice!). They all give me back my jeep to tell me it is good to go and running great. Which is true for about a week or less and then boom dead in the middle of a road once again. I need help from someone experienced in these older models! I am tired of spending thousands of dollars to have it break down again! Do you have someone worthy the challenge
My car has a manual transmission.

Hi there. What your vehicle needs is a gnome. Gnomes fix what gremlins screw-up.

First off, the electrical draw should be isolated. Disconnecting the negative battery terminal and putting a test light inline between the negative terminal and negative post, should light the test light if there is a draw present. Remove the fuse(s) and relay(s), and disconnect electrical component(s) one at a time until the test light goes out or dims and you should be able to isolate the draw. The battery always draining within 48hrs would be considered moderate draw. Your engine dying, previously, was apparently fuel related since you were able to get it to start with a few sprays of engine starting fluid. This time, the issue appears to be ignition related. It could be that the ignition module that’s intermittently failing/has failed, which was a common fault back in the day. Testing a faulty ignition module can be difficult.

This could also be a faulty ignition pick-up coil; if this is the case, a resistance value test could confirm the fault. It could be, a faulty ignition coil, a faulty ECM (engine control module), an electrical connection and/or wiring related problem. With all of the possibilities. I recommend having a certified YourMechanic technician inspect your vehicle’s dies random dying.

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