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How Long Have Cars Been Using Sensors?

Car sensor oxygen

A Check Oil light comes on and you know you need to add a quart. You back up and hear that familiar beeping noise letting you know you’re close to the car behind you. These actions are the result of sensors on your modern vehicle. Numerous sensors have been added to cars over the years to enhance the performance, efficiency, and safety of the car, but they have been around for years.

Early sensors

One of the primary sensors on a vehicle is the oxygen sensor. Each vehicle made today has at least one, and many have more than that. The sensor was first used in the late 1970s and was developed by the Robert Bosch Company.

Even before that, the wheel speed sensor was being developed. It was seen on the Chrysler Imperial in 1971. This sensor was part of the early ABS system.

Another sensor that’s been around for numerous decades is the throttle position sensor. It was added to engines in the later 1970s. Its purpose was to improve efficiency of the engines and helped replace the carburetor. The job of the throttle position sensor was to do what its name implies. It would determine the position of the throttle and alter the fuel intake to ensure optimal performance and efficiency.

While all of these early sensors are still in existence - along with many more - they have all changed and developed in answer to changing needs of cars and drivers.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

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